Curious, adaptable and intelligent. The red fox is the perfect urban survivor

Curious, adaptable and intelligent. The red fox is the perfect urban survivor

  In an increasingly urban world, it’s remarkable to find a carnivore not only surviving, but thriving in the city

In an increasingly urban world, it’s remarkable to find a carnivore not only surviving, but thriving in the city

  By keeping to the shadows and leading a mostly nocturnal life, the red fox can live alongside man almost unnoticed

By keeping to the shadows and leading a mostly nocturnal life, the red fox can live alongside man almost unnoticed

  But even though we share our surroundings, after midnight the streets belong to the foxes

But even though we share our surroundings, after midnight the streets belong to the foxes

  They divide our neighbourhoods into their own territories. We are lucky to own a house, but a fox owns the whole street

They divide our neighbourhoods into their own territories. We are lucky to own a house, but a fox owns the whole street

 Dog foxes patrol their territories in the early morning, before the commuters head out for the day

Dog foxes patrol their territories in the early morning, before the commuters head out for the day

  In Bristol, territory size varies wildly. An outbreak of mange in the mid 90s killed 95% of the fox population

In Bristol, territory size varies wildly. An outbreak of mange in the mid 90s killed 95% of the fox population

 Mange is still present, but numbers have slowly been recovering and the surviving foxes are more resistant to the disease. Many territories however, still remain vacant

Mange is still present, but numbers have slowly been recovering and the surviving foxes are more resistant to the disease. Many territories however, still remain vacant

  Cars can also be a big killer. Around 50% of urban foxes die on our roads, with young foxes in most danger. Adults are much more streetwise and know their green cross code

Cars can also be a big killer. Around 50% of urban foxes die on our roads, with young foxes in most danger. Adults are much more streetwise and know their green cross code

  Sub-adults are generally more at risk in the city. A more inquisitive and adventurous nature is likely to get them into trouble

Sub-adults are generally more at risk in the city. A more inquisitive and adventurous nature is likely to get them into trouble

  Young foxes spend most of the summer near their dens in family groups, exploring their surroundings and slowly growing in confidence

Young foxes spend most of the summer near their dens in family groups, exploring their surroundings and slowly growing in confidence

  For some, confidence comes more naturally and they will investigate anything new in their environment - including a camera

For some, confidence comes more naturally and they will investigate anything new in their environment - including a camera

  Young vixens may stay with the family, but during autumn and winter, young dogs are adventuring further and starting to look for their own territories

Young vixens may stay with the family, but during autumn and winter, young dogs are adventuring further and starting to look for their own territories

  Prime real estate with a good set of bins is a patch worth protecting

Prime real estate with a good set of bins is a patch worth protecting

  Soon the adults become less tolerant of those reluctant to leave and do their best to help them pack their bags

Soon the adults become less tolerant of those reluctant to leave and do their best to help them pack their bags

  Sooner or later all young foxes must gather their courage if they are to make it on their own

Sooner or later all young foxes must gather their courage if they are to make it on their own

 And for those that choose to call it home, the city is just as safe and comfortable an existence as anywhere else

And for those that choose to call it home, the city is just as safe and comfortable an existence as anywhere else

  Curious, adaptable and intelligent. The red fox is the perfect urban survivor
  In an increasingly urban world, it’s remarkable to find a carnivore not only surviving, but thriving in the city
  By keeping to the shadows and leading a mostly nocturnal life, the red fox can live alongside man almost unnoticed
  But even though we share our surroundings, after midnight the streets belong to the foxes
  They divide our neighbourhoods into their own territories. We are lucky to own a house, but a fox owns the whole street
 Dog foxes patrol their territories in the early morning, before the commuters head out for the day
  In Bristol, territory size varies wildly. An outbreak of mange in the mid 90s killed 95% of the fox population
 Mange is still present, but numbers have slowly been recovering and the surviving foxes are more resistant to the disease. Many territories however, still remain vacant
  Cars can also be a big killer. Around 50% of urban foxes die on our roads, with young foxes in most danger. Adults are much more streetwise and know their green cross code
  Sub-adults are generally more at risk in the city. A more inquisitive and adventurous nature is likely to get them into trouble
  Young foxes spend most of the summer near their dens in family groups, exploring their surroundings and slowly growing in confidence
  For some, confidence comes more naturally and they will investigate anything new in their environment - including a camera
  Young vixens may stay with the family, but during autumn and winter, young dogs are adventuring further and starting to look for their own territories
  Prime real estate with a good set of bins is a patch worth protecting
  Soon the adults become less tolerant of those reluctant to leave and do their best to help them pack their bags
  Sooner or later all young foxes must gather their courage if they are to make it on their own
 And for those that choose to call it home, the city is just as safe and comfortable an existence as anywhere else

Curious, adaptable and intelligent. The red fox is the perfect urban survivor

In an increasingly urban world, it’s remarkable to find a carnivore not only surviving, but thriving in the city

By keeping to the shadows and leading a mostly nocturnal life, the red fox can live alongside man almost unnoticed

But even though we share our surroundings, after midnight the streets belong to the foxes

They divide our neighbourhoods into their own territories. We are lucky to own a house, but a fox owns the whole street

Dog foxes patrol their territories in the early morning, before the commuters head out for the day

In Bristol, territory size varies wildly. An outbreak of mange in the mid 90s killed 95% of the fox population

Mange is still present, but numbers have slowly been recovering and the surviving foxes are more resistant to the disease. Many territories however, still remain vacant

Cars can also be a big killer. Around 50% of urban foxes die on our roads, with young foxes in most danger. Adults are much more streetwise and know their green cross code

Sub-adults are generally more at risk in the city. A more inquisitive and adventurous nature is likely to get them into trouble

Young foxes spend most of the summer near their dens in family groups, exploring their surroundings and slowly growing in confidence

For some, confidence comes more naturally and they will investigate anything new in their environment - including a camera

Young vixens may stay with the family, but during autumn and winter, young dogs are adventuring further and starting to look for their own territories

Prime real estate with a good set of bins is a patch worth protecting

Soon the adults become less tolerant of those reluctant to leave and do their best to help them pack their bags

Sooner or later all young foxes must gather their courage if they are to make it on their own

And for those that choose to call it home, the city is just as safe and comfortable an existence as anywhere else

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